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. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work for him at republican headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york and a woman thought this is really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsay. i got an early start on my political work consulting career. she said that is so cute. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, all white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and the open it up, and there were all these donuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics. >> tuesday night, david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. that is followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire is all woman delegation. then, growing up at the white h
:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. columnist in a news analyst talks about the relationship with religion and american politics. he was introduced by the former missouri senator and ambassador to the united nations and john danforth. from washington university, this is an hour-and-a-half. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special co
one. >> great one for pop. >> you can see him just tearing up. >> overcome. >> aw. >> it's religion down there in the sec. all i can say is roll tide! and yeah, d-wade, can't he just hit an elbow or something? he goes for the man zone! oh! >> mean! mean. your christmas tree dropping pine needles d jack! , what happened? me and jason came back with drinks and all 20 nuggets were gone. we got nugged. there was a nugging. this guy just came running up... dip! dip! dip! shoveling 'em into his face! give me your nuggets- -we're like "no! save some for our boyfriends!" need more nuggets? jack's crispy, all-white meat chicken nuggets come with a choice of seven awesome sauces. an order of 20 is only $4.99 we should probably call the cops. i'll just get you more nuggets. no, thanks, i'm stuffed. your christmas tree dropping pine needles and taking up space? s >>> are you getting tired of your christmas tree dropping pine needles and taking up space? not the fear. the annual tree recycling program starts next week. they show us what they do with those trees. last year, more than
see him just tearing up. >> overcome. >> aw. >> it's religion down there in the sec. all i can say is roll tide! and yeah, d-wade, can't he just hit an elbow or something? he goes for the man zone! oh! >> mean! mean. your christmas tree dropping pine needles d ,,,,,,,,,, ♪ [ female announcer ] no more paper coupons. no more paper lists. [ dog barking ] no more paper anything. safeway presents just for u. save more. save easier. saving more, starts now. your christmas tree dropping pine needles and taking up space? s >>> are you getting tired of your christmas tree dropping pine needles and taking up space? not the fear. the annual tree recycling program starts next week. they show us what they do with those trees. last year, more than 500 tons of christmas trees were collected in san francisco. >> the day after christmas. just the returning gift. now you gotta get rid of the tree. we're moving on. see you tomorrow! ( band playing "late show" theme ) >> from new york, the greatest city in the world, it's the "late show" with d letterman. tonight... plus paul shaffer and the cbs or
of religion in a second republic, in a postrevolutionary egyptian state. and there were some new elements introduced that hadn't existed in previous constitutions. there was a larger role carved out for religion with a number of articles in the constitution. that had been controversial, not so much for what they did but insomuch as i think more than as much as they were in what they allowed for. so you had, for example, article 2 is the standard iteration of the role of sharia -- the principles of sharia in defining legislation, but you also had article 4, which allowed for a role of the al-azhar university for the first time, which is an unelected body, a religious body that issues religions opinions. and so this role was very vague, but it was enshrined in the constitution. you also had probably the most controversial is article 219, which attempted to define what principles of sharia actually meant, and in doing so i think the wording, of course, is very vague and i would say it doesn't open -- it doesn't create a religious state, but it opens the door to a religious state that could b
baptist church as a hate group for targeting homosexuals, the military and other religions. it's now the single most supported petition ever on whitehouse.gov. >>> 4:39. toyota will pay more than $1 billion to settle a class action lawsuit over unintended acceleration in some of its vehicles. the settlement is one of the largest of its type in automotive history. drivers sued toyota because floor mats were stuck causing the vehicle to accelerate. under the agreement toyota will install a brake override system and other special safety features on more than three million cars. >> for consumers it means that two major defects in toyota vehicles are going to get fixed. so the bad news, well, how many more defects are there? how many more recalls are there going to be? i mean, after all, toyota in the last three years has recalled over 10 million vehicles. >> if it's approved by a federal judge, toyota will make cash payments to owners who sold their cars at a reduced price due to the bad publicity. the settlement, however, does not resolve claims by people who want money for injuries or
men and women of faith, but today, religion is very politicized. can you talk about that? >> faith, this belief, this sense that somehow and some way we will overcome, this belief that, in spite of all the odds setbacks, delays come interruptions, that we will make it, that we will arrive at a place where we recognize and respect and dignity and the work of every human being. it is the keeping with the philosophy and the discipline of nonviolence to believe that we will and we shall overcome, that we will not get lost in a sea of despair, that we will not become bitter or hostile, but with our faith, and we know the victory is there. it may take longer, it may be difficult, but you come to that point where there is no turning back without that sense of faith, we would not be where we are today. people ask me all the time what you did not give up, why you did not turn backed, why you did not fight back. my faith kept me going, kept me grounded, kept me anchored. >> president obama will be giving his renomination address at the democratic convention in the bank of america stadium. i
children were not killed in sandy hook based upon their ethnicity or their religion or their politics. it was human beings shot by madness. and the combination of a mental depression and that of posttraumatic syndrome, even put politics in chicago, for example, 49% people this year. 75% under the age of 18. so we look at 27, which was such a gross situation there in sandy hook, but in chicago, that's why at some point the president would come and speak in chicago and right here in inglewood because he is not just about mental illness. it's also about politics of war, drug war, guns, and drugs in and jobs out. we have a very different warfare scene than in a place like this. >> what would you do to protect school children right now? >> i think, first, the ban on assault weapons is a step in the right direction. secondly, stop gun trafficking across state lines, second thing. the third thing is you must -- we have more police patrols around schools in chicago, in inglewood, for example. shootings are down because more police patrol. but these are official police patrolling as opposed to
rifle and body armor? steve siebold is the author of the book "sex, politics, and religion ,"and david corn is the washington bureau chief for "mother jones" magazine. mr. siebold, are you comfortable with what the nra put forward today? >> well, absolutely. i mean, this is the only answer. that more guns equals less crime. i mean, if we don't arm the teachers, if we don't have guards at the schools, this is going to happen again. there's no question about it, whether we do this or not. but at least the teachers have a fighting chance. at least they have a fighting chance to save those little kids. >> do i understand your view to be that it would be a requirement for teachers? what if i'm a teacher who doesn't want to carry a firearm? i'm not proficient and i want nothing to do with guns. >> i don't want my kid in your class, then. because my kid is in danger -- >> wow? real? >> i'll send my kid to another school. >> so to a young person today who's pursuing a career in education, they would also need to be trained and comfortedble with the idea of carrying a weapon? >> unfortunately,
of religion, says it only applies to certain entities. it doesn't. and the idea that congress here, through the president's plan, has burdened the religious exercise of hobby lobby to the point where they're being compelled to violate their conscience, i can't imagine the founders would have thought that to be a very good idea. again, i go back to the basic point. all they had to do was keep a status quo here. >> kelly: that's a very good point here 'cause they're facing a million dollars in fines every day and they provide a lot of employment. what happens to a company like this because they're standing on their faith principles? >> eric: it's a tough call. it's like chick-fil-a, the same thing. the difference with that is that people came and said we're going to support chick-fil-a. they got that support. this is a big one because if hobby lobby wins this, they probably already lost it, but if they somehow prevail in the courts, there are a lot of faith-based companies, founders of companies that would like to do the same. the question is, will there be anyone else besides churches and re
free speech rights in the first amendment. why wouldn't they have the free exercise of religion rights that are also in fact, they start the first amendment as the religious -- i think it's a very important point to make that though hobby lobby has had a tough time taking this to get the preliminary injunction, nothing has been decided on the merits. we actually just won yesterday in 7th court of appeals. our client. corporation. not a religious organization. a regular company. they got the injunction, we have done that for two other of our clients we're 3 for 3. the judges matter in this situation who you get before you this is important precedent. how many companies might have an objection to providing the morning after pill. what justice society to my your said they are not religious organizations. how do you get around that burden? >> i think you get around the burden by saying forever legal purposes this is not a fun term for people and it's true. this is how the law works. when you look at the law really holding here it's the first amendment. really the religious freedom restorat
and religion t is widespread. there is frustration about it. as julie said there is a deep vein of frustration in the country. and i think that is what we are seeing, this this one case has sparked off, you know, this citizen's protest didn't come out of nowhere. it's not a new issue. there have been sexual violence against women in india for many, many decades. but i think the sense ever a new feeling of kind of liberation about being able to take to the streets and say something about it is why we are seeing so much action right now. >> when a woman overcomes her own misgivings, pressure from her own family, and actually goes to the police, what happens? are the accusations investigated? are the accused tried? >> well this is one of the bigger problems, ray. because first of all it has to be said that the vast majority of the rapes are not reported in india as all over the world. but especially in india because it is a huge that would. there is a cultural no-no against it. it can ruin your life, if are you raped will you not get married. you could be thrown out of your village. so that is th
laws, or is it the view that you should protect the free exercise of religion to the greatest extent possible? we look at these cases and resolve them according to our best view of the law not in terms of a political or conservative agenda. now, there are ways of characterizing us that make a little bit more sense in terms of the work we do. some of my colleagues refer to it here fairly strictly to the text of the statute. others of my colleagues like to look more expansively to what we call the legislative history, the background of the statute or its purpose, and it makes sense to refer to them in those terms. some of us think it's very important be what the framers -- what the framers of the constitution were thinking about at the founding when they drafted it, others of us on the court take a more flexible view and think that the interpretation of the constitution should be informed by evolutionary developments. again, those sorts of things make sense. it's just easer isier, i -- easier, i think, for reporters to say that justice is liberal, and that justice is conservative, and
michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations, then george will talks about religion and politics. later, james taylor from a recent appearance at the national press club. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i'm a big decision and broke with the democratic party, and went to work for john lindsay. i went
. we studied the great religions of the world. we studied for.her martin luther king junior was all about and we were ready and we would be sitting in her standing in at a theater or going on a freedom ride and we would be beaten, we would be jailed. but we didn't strike back. we had it as a way of living, in way of life, that it's better to love into hate. we wanted to build a community. we wanted to be reconciled. so this book is also about reconciliation. to give you one example, i first came to washington d.c. they first come in 1861 to go on something called a freedom ride. 18 of us, seven right and six african-americans came here may 1st. we participated in nonviolent workshops and i will never forget him the night of may 3rd, someplace in downtown washington, we went to a chinese restaurant. growing up in rural alabama, going to school in nashville i'd never been to a chinese restaurant before. never had a meal at a chinese restaurant. but at night we had a wonderful meal. food was good and someone said, you should eat while because this may be like the last supper. the next
carried the signs and whatever. i thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. i think all the people at this table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, she went into the new hampshire legislative when i was 12. she would pile everybody in the station wagon and take us to a neighborhood and drop the kids off. we would run down going door-to- door with the leaflets. then she would pick us up at the other end and take us to the next three. but at the end of the day we got an ice-cream cone, so it was all worth it. [laughter] >> all of us had strong mothers. that is what we are hearing here. my mother was my hero come t
politics and religion. >> both the house and the senate will return tomorrow. the senate is in a 10:00 a.m. eastern to work on two bills, one to extend provisions of the foreign intelligence service act and another is a relief package for areas affected by hurricanes can be. a vote is planned for 5:30 p.m. eastern on a least one of those measures. and the house returns at 2:00 p.m. eastern. their agenda depends on the status of the fiscal cliff negotiations. debate is possible in both chambers on any possible deal. live coverage at the house here on c-span and the senate on c- span 2. >> now a look at the war in syria and the potential for ssad regime.the a joined by former state department analyst, this is just over an hour. >> thank you, everybody, for coming this afternoon for a very timely discussion. on behalf of our chairman of the board, i want to welcome everybody to the center for national policy. i am the senior fellow for the middle list -- for the middle east here at cnp. we will discuss what is in store for the post-assad syria. mark twain once said that news of my death has
this is a cradle of islam and christianity and judiascan m. all religions were born in the middle east and how unfortunate on christmas day he and his family have to go through this all over again. >> there is sayed. >> fox news broke that case and i followed the case since the night he was arrested and we went to the media in order to not make the case worse. if you go to the media your case gets worse. >> what is your advice to americans and western christians that are watching this unfold and persecution that takes place. >> you want to be very careful when traveling to different parts of the world when you are from the west first of all and when you are openly christian and thirdly trying to convert others. both pastors were spreading the gospel and that is obvious low something they look at as spreading war. >> christianity even offers home in iran. thank you so much. >> my pleasure. >> we have i newspaper printing the name and addresses of every gun owner. someone turned the tables on the paper. but plus, tax incentives for electric cars and taxing owners for having electric cars. we'll
and various cities, there's no room for kids and not even a thought process. let's face it, religion is on the slide in terms of the major politics are in the newspaper. let's talk about those. >> i'm not a regulation man but we are fooling with the cycle of life. the cycle of life means you replace yourself for the next generation. western economies rely on growth. you stop growing, you're like a sha shark, you die, we need to do that for the debts we're piling up. what fuels growth is the next generation of young workerings. young workers are not coming into the workforce. look at southern europe with youth unemployment. take 15% youth unemployment in spain and compound that with the fact they stop having babies. what happens in a generation or two. >> i tell you, bill, you got me thinking, i encourage readers to read this. in some of the biggest developed economies pushed the most growth are below a 2% utility rate. this has to be dealt with at some point. back to you. >> thanks, rick. >>> road trip and big bank is in highways an byways in the road for yield. we'll explain how. an
will on the historical link between religion and politics. at 10:50, singer-songwriter and james taylor, on c-span. >> the senate returns to legislative business on thursday and house as a performance session scheduled that day. the senate is in at 10:00 a.m. eastern for work on two bills. the first would extend provisions of the foreign intelligence surveillance act. the other is a relief package for those affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on our companion network, c-span2. house members are on standby as negotiations continue on the so- called fiscal cliff. >host: we turn our attention to unemployment insurance and health benefits could be impacted. joining us is josh boak. when we are talking about unemployment insurance, what specific programs are talking about here? guest: unemployment insurance is a combination of federal and state program. usually last 62 weeks. it is that extension beyond that six months time frame that we are talking about as part of the fiscal cliff tops. that is what automatically expires. we know that it costs about $30 billio
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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